4 Unconventional Tips for a Healthy Mind and Body

I recently shared on Facebook that my husband and I essentially split an entire pizza in one night. Yes, I ate my fair share of it, and guess what… No guilt! I’ve honestly been eating A LOT of fun food since he’s been home from a recent deployment. We’ve really been enjoying ourselves, to say the least. But again, I really don’t feel guilty about it. I eat normal or relatively healthy most chances that I get, but if the husband wants to go out for lunch one day, you better believe I’m not going to argue with him.

 I really haven’t been surprised by my feelings towards food lately, as I’ve had this mindset for a while now. I have to admit that it has taken a while for me to get here mentally. Generally, when people start off on a health and fitness journey to lose fat, build muscle, and what not, they tend to really dive in and anything that might possibly hold them back (according to some lore they once heard) from reaching their goals will be shelved. Sometimes people even cut out all fruit and dairy, which seems insane to me unless you genuinely don’t like fruit or dairy, or they cause you discomfort. 

Despite all this “fun” eating, I haven’t gained a pound. 

Yep. 

Not a single pound. 

My skinny jeans and workout clothes all fit exactly the same. Now, I haven’t exactly lost any weight either, but considering all the yummy foods and drinks I’ve been embibing in, that’s of no surprise. But it’s also not the goal right now. 

  

So how did I get here? How have I become more physically and mentally stable with regards to dietary changes that at one time would have made me feel disgusting and bloated, along with making me feel guilty and undisciplined? 

1. I built a ton of muscle. Okay, Jess. What the hell does that have to do with anything? Well, 1. I weigh a lot more, which means I can get away with eating a little more without negative repercussions. And 2. The large amount of muscle I carry has greatly improved my insulin sensitivity. In lieu of getting into the science of how this works, I’ll just get to the good stuff. Training hard allows your body to UTILIZE food better, rather than just allowing it to…cling…and become fat. 

2. When I expect to eat a “fun” meal, I try to make it a priority to get in some challenging anaerobic activity. High volume weight lifting, sprints, and metabolic conditioning all improve insulin sensitivity. So while I may have been eating a lot of good food, I’ve also been putting it to good use by getting in some hard training sessions. 

3. I have stopped viewing food as something I need to “burn off.” Notice how I said in tip #2 that I’ve been putting my food to “good use?” I like to view my food as an awesome, tasty fuel. I view it as something positive rather than a scary thing that causes me issues and makes me fat. Food doesn’t make you fat in itself. But if you take in more fuel than your body requires from day to day, you might eventually create some problems for yourself. So if you’re planning on indulging, prep your body for it by improving your insulin sensitivity and get your lift on! Or, on the back end, put that fuel you ingested the day before to work. That’s a much more positive mindset than “burning off sludge,” right? 

4. I eat moderately all the time now. Life is just too short to cut out all the foods I love 100% of the time. I love a good burger… Pizza… Wine… Desserts… To me, life just isn’t worth living without them! But I also know how to keep it in check. I don’t eat those things every day, but they’re also never off-limits. Putting foods “off-limits” just makes you want it more, so when you finally take the opportunity to indulge in that slice of cake, it can be quite easy to say “eff it” and eat the entire cake instead! So rather than just indulging in an innocent piece of cake, you have overindulged and probably now feel guilty and extremely full…and utterly crappy. Now, if you allow yourself to have bits and bites of delicious things on a more regular basis, accidents like that are a lot less likely to happen. For example, I’m currently on the road and traveling. I’m having a great time visiting friends and family, but I haven’t really felt the desire to overindulge in anything because I honestly don’t have any cravings for anything! Why? Because I allow myself to eat delicious food all the time. AND I manage to stay lean while doing it because I never overdo it. It’s really a win-win situation. 

Maybe the all-or-nothig approach works for some people, but for me it doesn’t. I like the more moderate approach to eating as it makes me feel satisfied and fulfilled. I never feel like I’m “missing out” on something amazing. This approach may not work the best if you’re trying to drop the last few pounds for a fitness photo shoot, but how often in our lives are we really preparing for something like that? For most of us, not often. I’m finding this approach to be much more sustainable than the all-or-nothing approach. Both my mind and body are happier this way. There are never any weight rebounds, there’s less bloating, my thoughts about my body are more positive, and there’s less stress about food. Plus, I just find it easier to stay lean this way.

So for those of you who have found the all-or-nothing approach to be too challenging, go easier on yourself and try putting these tips to use. If you do try them out, let me know how it goes for you! I know I can see myself living this way forever. 

This Simple New Habit is a Game-Changer

You may know this by now as I don’t really keep it a secret, but I hate steady state cardio. The thought of it creates a sense of dread in me. Just imagining doing the same, boring, painful thing for 30, 45, 60 minutes or more conjures up feelings of a whiny, tantruming toddler in me. For instance, when people tell me they “loooove” running, I think to myself “Really? How can this be? Why on Earth…?” Some people have told me that they use that time to think. All I’d be thinking about is “Why am I doing this?! This hurts! Ugh! It’s only been 5 minutes!?” You know, miserable stuff like that. (And I know this because I too used to be a “cardio bunny.”) Due to these negative feelings, I just don’t run unless I plan on participating in a 5k or something. But there is one steady state cardio activity that actually gives me more positive “feels” and that is….. Wait for it….

Walking.

What am I? An 80 year old woman? Hey man, walking is awesome! It doesn’t hurt… It won’t damage my joints… It won’t age my skin (yes, high impact exercise can cause a jolt to the skin which can cause collagen breakdown)… It’s relaxing… And I can multitask when I walk. Multitask? Yep. I can read my e-mails. I can get through a couple chapters in a book. I can dictate blog posts. I can watch YouTube videos. I can do all sorts of things! Mind you, I’m doing this in the comfort of my own home on my treadmill. OR I can do nothing except walk and just let my mind wander. Later in the day I take my dogs for a walk through our neighborhood, otherwise they’ll drive me nuts. There’s no multitasking on those walks. There’s only dog-wrangling and picking up poop.

For the last few weeks I’ve been getting up a little earlier, pouring myself a big ol’ coffee, and hopping on the treadmill with that and my iPad for at least a 30 minute walk at a relaxing pace (3.0-3.5). It has been such an enjoyable way to start my day. Normally I would have my coffee and do my morning reading on the couch with the news on, so now I’m just doing the same thing but I’m not sitting on my ass! And by mid-day I’ve already gotten in my 10,000 steps or more! I’ve been enjoying it so much that I think I might keep it as a (mostly) daily habit.

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One key to creating a new exercise (or even non-exercise) habit is to find something you love (that also moves you towards your goals) and then find a way to fit it into your routine! It takes a while to form a new habit, but give it a few weeks of consistent work and you could soon be doing it for life! For a while it might be necessary for you to actually schedule your new, soon-to-be habit into your day. Then it’ll eventually become part of your daily routine. Remember, no one HAS time for exercise.

We MAKE time for exercise.

I don’t care how busy or not-so-busy someone is. Schedules can always be tweaked. You can always wake up juuuuuust a little bit earlier or go to bed a liiiiiittle bit later if you have to. My husband and I used to get up at 4:45 AM to fit our workouts in. He would set our coffee pot to brew at 4:30, so that there was an additional incentive to get up. We also moved the alarm clock across the room to force him to physically get up. Utilizing little tricks likes these to reinforce your new habit can be very helpful!

The point of this message isn’t to dissuade you from running and convince you to walk instead. The point is to give you permission to discard the stuff you hate and make a habit of doing the stuff you love, especially with exercise. If you dread a certain form of exercise and never look forward to doing it, then you have to ask yourself “why” you’re doing it in the first place. There are loads of ways to fit fitness into your life! Just find something you love doing that moves you closer to YOUR goals and DO IT CONSISTENTLY. Make a fun ritual out of it. For example, I drink my coffee and play on my iPad or listen to podcasts while I walk. Those things make it so much more fun to me! So I actually enjoy getting up a little earlier to fit it in. It’s my quiet “me-time.” It may not be “hardcore” or extremely challenging, but that’s not the purpose of it. That’s what my weightlifting is for. Walking for me is more restorative and is a nice way for me to get my blood flowing in the morning. Plus, because of my Fitbit, I am much more conscious of how many steps I’m taking in a day. My morning walks ensure that I hit my personal step goals.

As an aside, as I was discussing this blog post with my husband he said that what I was saying reminded him of the book he is currently reading: Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives by Gretchen Rubin (author of The Happiness Project). I’m very interested in the development of habits as I truly believe that developing habits is the key to living a healthy life…forever. I’ve decided I’m going to give that book a read as well! If you’d like to join me, you can pick it up here!

Most Women are Making This Huge Mistake…

You may have heard the phrase “comparison is the thief of joy,” and often it’s used when people are comparing themselves to others. But what if you aren’t necessarily comparing yourself to others… You are instead comparing your current self to your old self.

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As a trainer, I often hear something along the lines of “Oh, I was 10-15 lbs. lighter when I got married. I want to be there again.” Then I have to go into a lecture about how much their lives have changed in those 10+ years. Oh, you know, just reminding them about the numerous kids they gave birth to, the lifestyle changes, the cross-country moves, the stress of their jobs, the hormonal changes brought on by age…the list goes on. These are important factors that DO play into the current status of your body.

I also ask them how much they were working out when they were 10-15 lbs. lighter, and it’s usually a lot more than they are now! Why? Because it was easier to set aside more time for exercise at that point. They didn’t have a husband and kids to chase around at that time. They might have had fewer responsibilities with regard to their job at the time. Our priorities change throughout our lives, and getting to the gym is not always going to be #1. And you know what? That’s okay! And it should be that way!

Yes, staying healthy is very important. It’s important to keep yourself in shape so that you can bring your best-self to the world. Being healthy makes you a better spouse, a better parent, a better employee/employer, whatever your title is, it makes you better at it. By exercising and eating healthy you have more energy to push yourself through life. You’ll also have less stress and get sick less often. You’ll look and feel better, thus pushing your confidence through the roof. So yes, your health should be one of your priorities, especially since no one is going to take care of you better than you can take care of yourself. But at busier stages in your life, you may have to get a bit more crafty with finding the right balance of exercise + work + family + personal time + whatever.

I really think we should be more compassionate with ourselves. Many of the women I work with beat themselves up on a regular basis. Why aren’t they giving themselves credit for all of their accomplishments? They’re all intelligent, independent women but then they spend so much time talking crap to themselves in the mirror because of some extra fat on their stomach or thighs. I have to admit that I’m guilty of this as well. And I haven’t met a single woman that isn’t that way. But when you look at it as an outsider, it really does seem ridiculous. We’re way more than just our bodies. We have much more than our physical attributes to offer the world. It’s time to put the old you to rest and embrace the new you, whether you prefer its appearance or not. If you don’t like the appearance of your new self, then work to improve it, but there’s no point in comparing it to your old appearance. That’s just simply not fair to yourself and you’re not giving yourself credit for all the things that have happened between now and then.

We’re not plastic. We’re complex beings that are affected by age and we wear with life. Comparing ourselves to our 20 year old selves is just like comparing ourselves to 20 year old strangers. It’s nonsense and doesn’t do us any good. Where ever you are in life, you have to work with what you’ve got and just do the best that you can. Do your best to stay healthy. Do your best to stay strong. And do your best to stay happy, despite not looking like your 20 year old self. Besides, at this point I know I’m smarter, wiser, happier, and I have waaayyyy more muscle. 😉

 

How I REALLY Feel About Meal Plans

In the past I’ve been on several meal plans designed by other coaches to help push me to meet some challenging goals. Generally, those who are held accountable by other people tend to be more successful in meeting their physique goals. I definitely learned a lot through working with other coaches but I recently came to the conclusion that meal plans just aren’t for me. Why? Well, I just can’t imagine following one for a long period of time anymore. The thought of that just sounds like a prison sentence to me. The food prep (bulk cooking)… The meal prep (measuring out into containers)… Packing food so you don’t (heaven forbid!) “miss a meal.” Doesn’t that sound exhausting? Is that really the way to live your life? And for what? Slightly smaller thighs? Slightly more chiseled abs? If it’s worth it to you, then by all means, go ahead! They can work well, provided you have a good and knowledgable coach and you’re willing to put in the hard work.  I just think I’m at a point in my “journey” where that just seems like nonsense and the juice just isn’t worth the squeeze. Maybe I’m getting old and stubborn? 😉

Before I go any further, I just want to clarify exactly what I mean by a “meal plan.” A meal plan is a formally designed planned with precise foods and measures of foods that one is to follow to achieve a certain goal. That goal might be fat loss, muscle gain, or even maintenance.

So let me tell you why I’m no longer a big fan of them and why I don’t prefer to provide them for my own clients…

1. No one really learns anything from following a strict meal plan. While yes, it may be nice that you don’t have to think about what you’re going to eat because it’s all laid out for you, don’t you think that you should have to think about what you’re eating? Don’t you think there is something important about making a conscious decision about what you’re putting into your body? I think it’s important for an individual to figure out what they like or dislike eating and what agrees or disagrees with their body, without the intervention of a coach telling them what is good, not-so-good, or “bad” even.

2. Freedom. As humans, we like to feel like we’re making decisions for ourselves. Once someone tells you what you can or can’t do, don’t you get a slight feeling that you want to rebel against that? That feeling is natural. If your coach tells you that you aren’t allowed to have cake, don’t you all of a sudden start craving some cake? Even if you don’t really like cake…? It’s silly, but our minds do tend to work that way. Put something completely off-limits and boom, ya want it!

3. Off-Plan Guilt. So when you finally decide to go for that amazing slice of cake, you have a tendency to feel guilty for having eaten it because it wasn’t “on your plan.” And now you have to deal with the consequences of that. Maybe your trainer will be upset with you (if this is the case, fire them), or you might become upset with yourself. Getting down in the dumps about eating a slice of cake is the opposite reaction you should be having! You just ate some delicious cake! You should be enjoying that experience to the fullest! Not feeling crappy about it afterwards. Yeesh.

 

So what’s my solution? How can you get around following a strict meal plan yet still achieve your goals?                  

 Count your calories and macronutrients.

“But Jessssss, that’s so neurotic and time consuming!” Uh… No. No, it’s not. It’s especially not as neurotic and time consuming as constantly cooking, constantly prepping, and constantly packing the same meals day in and day out. When I count calories and macronutrients I essentially eat like a normal person, varying my food choices from day to day, and just calculate my totals towards the end of the day or before my last meal. Then I just adjust my last one or two meals at the end of the day to account for more or less calories.

In case you feel like I’m leaving you out on a branch wondering what the heck macronutrients are, they’re proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. These make up the bulk of your diet. I like to vary these throughout the week to ensure that I’m getting a broader amount of nutrients. If you eat the same things day in and day out, you’re more likely to be lacking in certain important nutrients. And that’s no bueno.

So how do you know what your calories and macronutrient percentage should be? Well, that’s going to be completely individual. I don’t know you and I don’t know your goals, so it would be irresponsible of me to advise you one way or another. A good general starting place if you don’t know your current maintenance calorie level is to take your current weight and multiply that times 15. Eat that many calories for a couple weeks and see what happens. If you gain weight, you might want to lower those calories (unless weight gain is your goal.) See? It’s all trial and error anyways. You just have to tweak things as you go. I generally set my protein intake at 1g per pound of bodyweight or a little lower and fill in the rest of my calories with a good balance of carbs and fats. Easy peasy. I don’t get too crazy about it as I have no plans of stepping on a competitive stage in a bikini.

Have you ever followed a meal plan? How did it make you feel?

 

The ULTIMATE Diet and Training Program

IMG_0398-0The time has come! You can officially stop looking for the best training and diet program! How exciting is that? No more kooky diet books. No more training and diet gurus. No more false, empty promises. No more cutting out foods that you love. First, let’s look at what pitfalls and traps you may have been falling into…

You decide you want to lose weight so one week you cut out all gluten because you heard that gluten is making you fat. Yes, that must be why you’re overweight. But nothing changes. Next you decide it must be the dairy that’s keeping you overweight, so you cut that out too. But nothing changes. Maybe it’s your workout. You’ve been on this training program for a whole two weeks, BUT NOTHING IS CHANGING! Ugh! The frustration of it all!

You’re looking for an easy way out. You’re looking for the special secret or the magical path. Well, I have the secret… but it’s not sexy and it’s not new.

You’re overcomplicating things.

and

You’re not focusing on consistency in the basics.

So boring, right? Well, yeah, that’s the reality of long-term, sustainable physique changes. It’s slow, it can be miserable, and short-term results can be pretty lackluster. Every day you get up and just put one foot in front of the other, following the basic rules, and one day you wake up and have somehow hit your goal!

There are no miracle foods. There are no miracle supplements. There are no miracle workouts. And yes, while WHAT you eat is important for fat loss, muscle gain, or whatever your goal is, but HOW MUCH you eat is very important too. And you know what? Americans are really, really bad at estimating how many calories they’re eating. Like underestimating-by-40%-bad…

As promised here’s your: Miracle Diet Plan!

  • Start writing down everything you eat in a day. EVERY DAMN THING! (If you’re not seeing results with your current “plan” or lack there of.)
  • If you’re currently eating a lot of processed, packaged, junky food and not seeing results, switch to more nutritious, whole foods. (You should do this regardless of body composition goals…)
  • If you’re currently “eyeballing” your food intake and not seeing results, start using measuring cups or hand measurements.
  • If you’re currently using measuring cups or hand measurements and not seeing results, start using a food scale. (Trust me, it’s a wake up call. Your measuring cups are lying to you…)

And here’s your: Miracle Training Plan!

  • Get up and move.
  • If you’re currently jumping from workout program to workout program and not getting results, choose ONE damn program and STICK TO IT! (Unless your program really does suck…)

These are the basics. I’m not even going to get into what to eat. You generally know what’s healthy. You generally know what’s not healthy. You know you should be eating healthy most of the time and not healthy very little of the time. Now you just have to do it. You know you should be getting exercise, so just get up and move. I don’t care what it is. The key here is to start doing SOMETHING and do it CONSISTENTLY. Eat relatively healthy CONSISTENTLY. Eat according to your goals CONSISTENTLY. Move according to your goals CONSISTENTLY. It really is a simple formula. But just because it’s simple doesn’t mean it’s easy.

Being consistent day in and day out is the challenge. Like I said earlier, it’s boring, it’s dull, and results can be slow to come. But isn’t every diet that way after the first week? At first you jump into it with the excitement and fervor of a giddy child, but after the first week or two you’re ready to throw in the towel. This is what separates the successful from the unsuccessful people; their willingness to endure. So don’t make it harder on yourself by religiously cutting out all gluten, dairy, carbs, or whatever your diet guru is telling you (unless you have a real, genuine sensitivity to something.)

*I would like to emphasize that I don’t think calorie counting and weighing or measuring food is necessarily an extremely long-term lifestyle approach. It can become overwhelming and it’s important to learn how to read the natural cues that your body is giving you in terms of hunger and nutrient needs. However, I feel like many have lost that sense of what it feels like to truly be hungry and in NEED of food. Counting and measuring for a while can help reign in your eating habits and can potentially be quite an eye-opener for those who are trying to lose, maintain, or gain weight. BUT a more intuitive approach to eating should be the ultimate goal.*

I hope this was somewhat of a wake-up call for some of you who have a tendency to hop from diet to diet and workout to workout. You’re just never going to see results that way. Find a plan that works for you and that you ENJOY, stick with it, and just keep sticking with it.

What’s the Best Time of the Day to Exercise?

ParkWorkout“What’s the best time of the day to exercise?” I get asked this a lot, and my answer is ALWAYS “the time of the day that you’ll actually do it.”

If I don’t workout sometime in the morning, it just ain’t happening. I know myself pretty well at this point and that’s just the gosh darn truth. I’ve been forced to exercise in the evening on occasion and I have always dreaded it alllll day. All I want to do at the end of the day is go home and wind down.

As the day goes on, other things come up and generally they’re more “important” than getting a workout in. While I always feel pretty good after a workout, sometimes they’re harder to justify, especially if you’re already in pretty good shape. The thought “I’m not going to lose muscle in a day of not working out” easily comes to mind and I move on.

Others prefer to workout in the evening. That schedule just works better for them. And that’s okay too! I’m personally a bit of an early bird so I like to knock out very important tasks in the morning; exercise being one of them…to me at least.

The key to finding a good daily or near daily workout time for you is to find a time where there are usually no other distractions; a time where generally nothing else is going on and nothing and no one can get in your way. That way you have very few excuses to cancel on yourself. And that’s another point right there! If you are not already in the habit of working out, actually sit down and SCHEDULE your workouts. Make them like meetings that you can’t miss with yourself unless you’re sick or something entirely unavoidable comes up. If you have to miss a session, then you just reschedule like you would any other appointment.

I try to drill this into the minds of my clients. Most of them I only meet twice a week, but I try to urge them to get in workouts on their own. But like I mentioned in my post last week about motivation, real, lasting motivation can’t come from an outside source, it has to come from within. So often my words go in one ear and out the other. If you haven’t built your me-time or gym-time into your day, it’s easily going to be bypassed or it’ll be something you do for a while and gradually you just stop working out altogether. Developing the habit is crucial to your success. Eventually it’ll just become something you do regularly without thought. It’ll be a no-brainer.

Once you have decided on the “perfect”” time, set yourself up for success. My husband makes sure to set the timer on the coffee pot to brew the coffee before he gets up so that there’s something to look forward to when he wakes up at the ass-crack-of-dawn. Have your gym bag packed or set your gym clothes out the night before. Create a routine. Build it into your day. Make it just a little bit easier!

For those of you who have been successful with creating the habit of working out regularly, what do you do or have done in the past to make building this habit easier? I would love to hear your ideas!

There is No “Wrong” Motivation

It seems lately that a lot of fitness peeps have been spouting out that you shouldn’t let your physique or appearance be your #1 motivation when trying to get in shape. My question is “why the hell not?” It’s not that I’m particularly a VAIN person, but when someone finds something that motivates them to get in some vigorous exercise and start eating healthier on a regular basis, why are physique goals not good enough? In a country where more than 1/3 of adults are considered obese, I think we have to take what we can get! And if the idea of looking hot in a pair of jeans is what gets someone off their ass, then so be it!

Most trainers will say that overall health and general fitness should be your “primary” goal. And yes, while I wholeheartedly agree with that, someone who is slightly overweight might not see it that way. They might be relatively healthy but they just want to finally see their abs or look cute in shorts because they have a vacation coming up. If that’s what keeps you motivated for the time-being, then that’s fine! It’s no one else’s business what your motivation is, whether it’s completely superficial or 100% honorable.

It’s true that you will never find peace and happiness when your appearance is always your #1 goal, because perfection just doesn’t exist…and it’s hard to achieve something that doesn’t exist. But I would also argue that if it’s strength you’re after, where does that stop? One can become so obsessed with getting stronger that they start accruing life-long injuries… One can become so obsessed with “general health” that they start going off the deep end and become an orthorexic. Extremes can occur anyway you look at it. Just because you started with one motivator, doesn’t mean that it will always be your #1 motivator. When something sparks you in the moment to get up and go for a walk or get in a quickie workout, run with it (literally)! Motivation can be hard to find, so when it comes along, take advantage of it. But remember this, the best motivation is the motivation that comes from within. No one else can truly motivate you. Not your significant other, not your trainer, not your friends. Any motivation that stems from them will be short-lived. And that’s okay! Sometimes we have to seek out motivation every day to keep moving forward.

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For example, I haven’t seen my husband since June of 2014. He’s due to be coming home shortly and you better believe I want to look good for him when he arrives! So right now, that’s guiding my motivation to put in an extra ounce of effort. That’s the one little thing that is pushing me to get in a couple conditioning workouts a week (along with my 4 weight training sessions) and really eyeball the food that I’m putting into my mouth. Thankfully I stay pretty close to my “happy spot” year-round, so I never have far to go when I just want to tighten things up a little bit. But this motivation is going to be short-lived. Eventually my husband will come home, we’ll go on a vacation, and then we’ll get back to normal life. That’s when my motivation will change. Maybe I’ll just want to focus on getting a little stronger or improving my endurance. Who knows? We’ll have to see what sparks me at the moment!

Remember, this is a journey with no end. Your goals and motivators will always be fluctuating depending on your situation in life at that one moment. The key to success though is to pick a goal….seriously go for it…conquer it…and move onto the next goal. Don’t flounder from goal to goal, program to program, and never actually accomplish anything! And always remember what got you started on that goal in the first place…that original motivator.

Since I mentioned that I’ll be putting in a little extra effort over the next month, I thought it might be fun to see what that little extra effort might actually do and share it with you all! This photo was taken this morning and I also weighed myself. I was randomly up 3 lbs., probably retaining some water, so here I weigh 143 lbs. I also took circumference measurements, so I’ll be tracking those as well. Along with my 4 weight training workouts, I’ll be throwing in 2 weekly conditioning workouts. So that might be sprints, a barbell complex, a ladder workout, or something of the sort. I will also actually be tracking my macronutrients and calories. Should be fun to see what happens!

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